Black Sapote Baked Custard with Blueberry Compote

Black Sapote Baked Custard with Blueberry Compote

Black Sapote Baked Custard with Blueberry Compote

Closely related to the Persimmon and native to Central America and Mexico, Black Sapote is often referred to as the Chocolate Pudding Fruit due to its resemblance to dark chocolate. However it is more suited to tropical climates. Black Sapote tastes delicious eaten as a dessert, in milkshakes, ice cream or as a replacement to chocolate due to its dark brown colour. Below we are sharing a quick and easy recipe for a Black Sapote baked custard with blueberry compote.

The Black Sapote fruit is green when picked. Wait about a week for it to ripen. When ripe, the flesh is dark brown to almost black and is soft and squishy to the touch. It has an almost bruised appearance. Further, a ripe Black Sapote has a beautiful creamy texture, similar to a ripe avocado and is sweet in flavour like a custard apple. Black Sapote has a low fat content. It is high in fibre and Vitamin C making it a great alternative to sweets. So have an open mind and try out this delicious fruit when available.

P.S. Alfalfa House Newtown does stock Black Sapote when available in season.

Use of Black Sapote In Food

Use Black Sapote in food and mostly in desserts. Here are few ways to use in different styles of desserts . (If you want to read more on this fruit, its cultural uses, harvesting etc we found this link with lots of useful info on the Black Sapote fruit. )

  • In the Philippines, the seeded pulp maybe served as a sweet treat often with milk or orange juice poured over it.
  • The Mexicans mash black Sapote pulp with orange juice to serve with whipped cream. Some times they also mix the pulp with wine, cinnamon and sugar to eat as a dessert.
  • Adding an acidic medium like lemon or lime juice to the pulp also makes a good filling for pies and pastry.
  • Churn the Black Sapote pulp with milk into ice cream
  • The people of Central America, ferment the fruit into a liqueur (tastes similar to brandy)
  • Bake this Black Sapote Bread (similar to a banana bread)

Now enjoy this Black Sapote custard Recipe here. The recipe and images courtesy of Sandra Clark, one of our members and volunteer

Black Sapote Baked Custard with Blueberry Compote

Black Sapote Baked Custard with Blueberry Compote

Alfalfa House Volunteer
A delicious custard recipe using black Sapote served with a blueberry compote
Prep Time 30 mins
Cook Time 25 mins
Total Time 55 mins
Course Dessert
Cuisine Australian
Servings 4 people

Equipment

  • 2 Saucepans
  • 2 Bowls
  • Fine Sieve
  • whisk
  • Wooden spoon
  • oven proof casserole dish or baking tray
  • glass pots or ceramic ramekins (ovenproof)

Ingredients
  

  • 1 whole black Sapote
  • 600 ml milk any kind
  • 1 vanilla pod (split lengthwise) or vanilla essence
  • 90 g rapadura sugar
  • 2 tbsp cold water
  • 2 tbsp hot water
  • 5 medium egg yolks
  • 1 medium egg whole

For the Blueberry Compote

  • 350 g blueberries (fresh or frozen)
  • 80 ml agave (or sweetener of choice)
  • 1/2 medium lemon (rind and juice)

Instructions
 

  • Pre heat oven to 180 degrees C
  • In a saucepan, heat milk with vanilla bean to boiling point, set aside.
  • Cut black sapote in half, remove seed and scoop out flesh. Puree with a fork.
  • In another saucepan heat rapadura sugar with the cold water until caramelised. Add the hot water to dilute the caramel. Put back on the heat and stir until smooth. Set aside
  • Put the egg yolks and eggs in a bowl and slowly add the caramel. Add black sapote then pour into milk. Pass through the mixture through a fine sieve.
  • Pour mixture into glass pots and place in a casserole dish
  • Half fill casserole with boiling water and cover with a lid or foil.
  • Cook for 25 mins or until just set. Leave in the hot water for 5 mins before refrigerating.

For the Blueberry Compote

  • Place half the blueberries and the rest of the compote ingredients in a saucepan
  • Bring to boil and cook for 8 minutes
  • Remove from heat and add rest of blueberries.
  • Serve with blueberry compote or fresh strawberries

Notes

Tips:
• Use leftover egg whites in omelettes or in biscuits
Keyword black sapote, recipes

buckwheat pancakes recipe

BUCKWHEAT – Delicious Buckwheat Pancakes Recipe


Recipe and blog post courtesy of Sandra Clark, member at Alfalfa House

Closely related to Rhubarb, buckwheat groats or seeds can be used in a variety of ways. Groats are not really a grain though they resemble one. However these seeds or groats are used to substitute grains in a gluten-free diet. By grinding the groats you can make your own buckwheat flour, the base for Sarasen crepes made in Brittany in France and soba noodles, popular in Japan. Here our volunteers have submitted a quick and easy buckwheat pancakes recipe that can be enjoyed for breakfast or brunch.

Native to south east Asia, the first recorded use dates back to China in the 5th Century. The name buckwheat however is derived from the Dutch word “beechwheat” as the triangular shaped seeds resemble beech nuts. It was first introduced into Europe in the middle ages where it became popular as a minor crop. It was also grown in North America, Africa and Brazil.

The Buckwheat plant is very hardy and grows in cold climates with poor soil. Use buckwheat as a whole grain or as a flour. Using it to make bread is not a great idea owing to its no gluten content. The most famous buckwheat of all buckwheat dishes is the Kasha, a specialty of Russia.

How do you use buckwheat (besides pancakes recipe) ?

Porridge:
Soak whole buckwheat grouts overnight then strain. Cover with water and cook for around 30 minutes and serve hot with poached fruits.

Bircher buckwheat:
Use cold porridge mix above and stir through natural yoghurt, honey, banana and dates.

Pancakes:
Use buckwheat flour in the below buckwheat pancakes recipe for breakfast or blinis. Top these with your favourite pancake toppings. Some ideas in the notes below.

More Buckwheat Recipes To Enjoy

Looking for some more inspiration ? Try out these nourishing and delicious recipes that use buckwheat

buckwheat pancakes recipe

Buckwheat pancakes with pineapple, banana and toasted coconut flakes

Alfalfa House Co-op Member
Quick and easy breakfast pancakes recipe made using wholegrain buckwheat and spelt flour. Shop for all these ingredients at your Newtown Food Co-op Alfalfa House
5 from 1 vote
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 15 mins
Total Time 30 mins
Course Breakfast
Cuisine American
Servings 4

Equipment

  • 2 mixing bowls
  • coffee/spice grinder
  • sieve
  • whisk
  • non-stick fry pan

Ingredients
  

  • 3 medium  Free range eggs separated
  • 65 g Ground buckwheat groats
  • 60 g Plain organic soft flour
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 140 ml milk
  • 1 pinch sea salt
  • 1/4 medium pineapple peeled, core removed and finely sliced
  • 1 medium banana
  • 50 g coconut flakes
  • 1 tbsp Maple syrup
  • 1 tbsp natural yogurt optional

Instructions
 

  • Pre heat oven to 150 degrees C.

For Dry Ingredients

  • Make buckwheat flour by placing groats in a coffee grinder and grind until fine
  • Measure flour then add to plain flour. Sieve into a bowl.
  • Add baking powder and salt to the flours
  • Toast coconut flakes (dry) in the oven on a baking tray for around 10 minutes until golden

For Wet Ingredients

  • Separate eggs, place yolks in a bowl and beat lightly with a whisk or fork then add milk
  • Make a well in the centre of the DRY ingredients and slowly add WET ingredients. Also add in the honey at this stage.
  • Whisk egg whites until they form firm peaks, ( will hold firm on the whisk) then gently fold through batter
  • Heat a non-stick frypan to medium heat, spoon in batter leaving space around each. Cook 2-3 minutes per side. Keep warm on a plate in the oven while making next batch.
  • Serve with sliced pineapple, sliced banana, toasted coconut flakes and a drizzle of maple syrup and maybe a spoon of homemade natural yoghurt.

Notes

  1. For coeliacs and gluten free diets simply use 125g buckwheat flour and no plain four.
  2. Other topping ideas: Blueberry, banana and agave syrup.  Caramelised apple or pear and chopped roasted hazelnuts
Keyword buckwheat pancakes, recipes


Woman cooking in the kitchen

War on Waste: Alfalfa House meets Caroline Brakewell

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed, citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” – Margaret Mead

Our Monthly Challenge: Be The Change

There is always more to do as the War on Waste continues.. in our homes, our neighbourhood and our community. The sharing of ideas, identifying and problem solving what’s within our reach, is a great place to start. Find a local campaign and help out. Involve our children, our neighbours, our local business owners and workplaces and begin by asking the simple question, “What can I do to contribute to the War on Waste?”

We spoke to volunteer and Alfalfa House member, Caroline Brakewell to find out how she’s contributing.

Let’s Get To Know…

Woman holding two bunches of carrots at a market

Name: Caroline Brakewell
Everyone knows her as: C
Star sign: Libra. Unbalanced!
What makes you happy? My toddler. World peace.
What do you do for work? Health coach, chef, mamma and Marketing Director at Alfalfa House.
What do you do for fun? Travel. Dip in the ocean and nature. Hang with friends.

How long have you been a member? Around a year

What made you join Alfalfa House?
I was introduced by a friend who’s been a member for years. I love the philosophy of not for profit and waste reduction. Plus the great discount on food from some of Australia’s best suppliers and knowing I’m supporting them.

What’s the main products you buy at Alfalfa?
Everything. I’m addicted to the chocolate coated macadamia nuts and turmeric paste. Knowing I’m feeding my daughter pesticide-free produce is a big pull for me.

What was the catalyst to you becoming an eco warrior?
I’ve been pretty conscious since my 20s but I think stats like plastic particles taking over the number of fish in the ocean was too alarming to ignore, so I tightened up much more.

Name 3 things you recycle?
Hard plastic, cardboard & clothing

Name 2 things you reuse?
Glass and old containers for shopping at farmers’ markets and at Alfalfa House.

Name 1 item you have repurposed?
Clothes. I very rarely buy new ones and give away mine to my Goddaughter in Scotland.

Was it hard to start?
It’s been a gradual process that started many years ago when I was living in London and I’d refuse to use plastic bags. I educated myself and made more changes where I could.

Any tips on organisation skills to reuse or recycle?
Have my bags, jars and containers packed and ready every time I leave home. Use the carriage on my pram to store shopping in.

What is that one piece of waste that irks you?
Plastic wrapped fruit in supermarkets. Supermarkets full stop.

Who in your circle do you admire their war on waste? And why?
All of the speakers and presentations at our recent open day. All doing their bit whilst educating others to create a ripple effect in our communities.

What’s your favourite War on Waste campaign that you’ve heard of?
I think the Alfalfa House Zero Waste philosophy, which has been around since 1981 is in perfect alignment with the War on Waste campaign.

What is your one piece of advice for someone who is thinking about becoming an eco-warrior but doesn’t know where to start?
Start somewhere. Refuse plastic bags. Encourage your family to do the same. Look at what you can reuse. Ask if you really need that new dress when you can buy second hand.


Going zero waste

Ruby Pandolfi is an arts and law student at UNSW and has been volunteering at Alfalfa House for a year. She’s also the volunteer coordinator at AYCC – Australian Youth Climate Coalition. Here she tells us about her journey to go zero waste.
If you are interested in zero waste and want to learn how you can do it, come you our open day on May 26.

In Australia alone, one million take away cups end up in landfill every minute. Right now, there are around 46,000 pieces of plastic in every square mile of ocean, and each year enough plastic is thrown away by us humans to circle the earth four times.

I’ve always thought of myself as someone who really really cares about the environment. I cared about the big issues: solar energy and renewables over fossil fuels, global warming, sea level rise, deforestation, overfishing, species extinction… the list goes on! And don’t get me wrong, I still 100% do. But I never consciously thought about the significance of my own individual acts, and their connection to the health of our planet. I would bring my own shopping bags to Woolies, but wouldn’t hesitate to buy my brown rice pasta in plastic packaging, my apples packaged in packs of six, or all my fruit and veg in plastic bags.

Gradually, I started to realise how crazy it is that something we use for 10 minutes to eat our lunch with, like a plastic fork and knife, will last on the earth for hundreds and hundreds of years after we die. Single use and disposable plastics like bottles, cutlery, takeaway containers, bags, coffee cups, straws, milk cartons etc, have become so normal to us in our daily lives that it seemed almost impossible to me that we could ever find a way to live plastic free.

But, as I began learning more and more about how common plastic was in my own life, I started to become aware of the choices that I had the power to make, which could have a pretty significant impact on decreasing my environmental footprint. I shifted my mindset from thinking that my own individual actions couldn’t possibly make THAT big of an impact on our earth, to knowing that everything we do has some significance – and that’s how I discovered zero waste!

Living a ‘zero waste’ lifestyle basically means trying to limit the amount of waste we produce as consumers. This includes:

  • reducing food packaging
  • saying no to disposable plastics
  • composting old food scraps
  • making your own consumables, such bathroom products to limit product packaging
  • reusing reusing reusing

After discovering this amazing but slightly intimidating concept, I quickly found that living a zero waste lifestyle wasn’t as hard as I thought if its broken up into small, achievable steps.

I started to buy all my food like grains, nuts, seeds, pastas and beans in bulk at Alfalfa House and invested in a set of reusable produce bags. I stopped buying from Woolies and Coles and bought fruit and veg loose from markets and co-ops instead. I started composting all my food scraps. Gradually, I also began to make my own bathroom products like toothpaste (it’s surprisingly easy!). I stopped using takeaway containers and bought my own reusable cutlery with me when I went out to eat.

But I still have a long way to go, and I’m not perfect by any stretch of the imagination! I still haven’t found a way to buy frozen blueberries for making smoothies without plastic packaging, or any store that sells tofu in bulk. I’ve found that sometimes we do slip up – we find ourselves in a situation where we’ve forgotten our water bottle or our reusable cutlery, and that’s totally okay. What counts is being conscious and aware of our choices and making the right ones wherever possible.

Since going zero waste I’ve become more mindful; more mindful of what I buy, what I don’t buy, where I buy it, how I store things, etc. I really believe that if everyone was more conscious about their consumption of things like disposable plastics, it would change the way we consume. This small paradigm shift would end up having big impacts on rubbish in landfill, biodiversity killed by plastic pollution and the overall state of our environment.

And it’s definitely not easy either. It takes some thinking ahead and preparation. And a lot of people won’t understand what you’re doing or why. Someone remarked to me a couple of months ago that we should be focusing on the bigger things like lobbying for fossil fuel divestment and renewables instead of wasting our time on something that won’t make much of a difference. But we have to consider both approaches; when people dismiss little acts, I feel they are missing a big opportunity. This cemented my view that we can’t discount the small things; they all add up in the end whether we realise it or not.

Going zero waste allows me to live my values and my truth; it’s about being conscious and compassionate by taking responsibility for the health of our environment. And it’s something that everyone can do. It may seem daunting at first, but when you break it down into little steps, you realise that it really is super achievable.

 


Bliss-balls

Harmonise-me bliss balls

In addition to being an Alfalfa House volunteer, Clara Bitcon is a women’s health naturopath and natural fertility educator. Her natural medicine practice, Medi.atrix Women’s Wellness, provides insightful and empowering guidance for women who want to take back their health naturally (www.mediatrixwellness.com.au).

In this blog, Clara teaches us about the ingredients in bliss balls, and introduces us to her easy recipe.

 

Bliss balls are no new kid on the block, but I’d love to share with you my version. They’re a cinch to whip up, and you can make them in sizeable batches as they’ll keep for quite some time in the fridge (up to 6 weeks). They’re perfect for a quick snack, or if you feel like a treat but would rather not reach for the dessert or chocolate, these guys can very nicely satisfy the urge. Highly
recommended with a brew of green or tulsi tea.

Based on a simple recipe, these bliss balls are meant to be played around with it as much or as little as you like. I like to rotate the nut butter, powdered herbs and spices to make something unique each time. Some people like to add stimulating herbs like guarana, matcha or kola nut. I prefer to use nourishing and balancing herbs. This particular combination of cacao and maca are excellent nourishers of the hormone and stress systems. They are two plants that have a lot going on for them.

Cacao: Elevating & Calming
As the Aztecs say, cacao is a food of the gods (and I’d say the modern world would happily agree).Unlike the cocoa commonly used in chocolate, raw cacao powder is unroasted and unprocessed. Cacao is abundant in the muscle relaxing and mind-calming mineral magnesium. It also contains a range of compounds that have a blissy action on the mind and elevate our mood. If you’re feeling a bit blue or anxious, have a project that requires a lot of mental focus or experience PMS, these bliss balls will make a fine
companion.

Maca: Energy & Balance
Maca is a herb that comes from the Andes Mountains of Peru. It is a member of the cabbage family. Many plants in this family contain a group of compounds that assist the body to process environmental toxins and excess hormones. It has traditionally been eaten as an energy enhancing food. One legend tells how Inca warriors were fed Maca to increase their strength before going into battle. After a city was conquered, Maca was prohibited to protect women from the heightened sexual desires induced by its consumption. The amount in this recipe won’t be having quite this level of intensity, but will give you a nice energy lift.

Bliss balls ingredients

Makes about 10-12 bliss balls

  • 1 cup nut butter (almond, tahini, cashew, brazil, sunflower or hemp are all good – if you can’t find the butter, process the nuts and add 1/4 cup of hemp seed or flax oil)
  • 1/2 cup honey (local, raw & organic). If you are vegan, you can replace honey with maple syrup. You may need to add more powders to get the right consistency.
  • 2 tablespoons of raw cacao powder
  • 2 tablespoons of maca powder (organic)
  • 1/2 teaspoon of powdered cinnamon and/or cardamom
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla bean paste (optional)
  • A couple of twists of sea, Celtic or Himalayan salt

Method

  • In a mixing bowl, combine the nut butter and honey and stir until smooth.
  • Add all the powders, spices and salt and mix.
  • The consistency should be thick enough to make into balls but not dry enough to feel crumbly. Play around with adding more powders or nut butter to get the consistency you need.
  • Roll into balls and roll in extra cacao powder or hemp seeds to cover. I like to store in a Tupperware contain and cover with extra cacao powder (you can use hemp seeds for this too). Keep in the fridge.
  • You can even throw a couple of these into a smoothie for a blissy herbal lift!